Posts Tagged ‘Days

Saturday March 10, 2012 02:07

Poll Reveals Bad Hair Days Make Us Depressed

 

bedheadhair.jpg (Slideshow)

Ever get in a dire mood from waking up with disheveled, unruly hair? Well, you’re not alone. According to Daily Mail, a new poll reveals that women will be moody and depressed for over an hour from waking up with uncontrollable hair.

One in twenty girls reported that they have been dumped for being grumpy from a bad hair day, while fourteen percent admitted to snapping at their children. However, if a woman is having a great hair day, 56 percent will be nicer to people and 67 percent will have a better day.

The poll of 2,000 women also shows that women will spend the equivalent of 26 years suffering from bad hair because most wake up with greasy, limp or uncontrollable hair at least three days a week. That’s about a third of your life.


Does our hair control our lives? Twelve percent of women admitted to cancelling a date if their hair could not be controlled, while the same percentage, surprisingly, also cancel get-togethers with friends. So, not only do we have to look perfect for potential suiters but we also have to look our best for our besties as well.

Do you cancel dates when you have unruly hair? What about brunch with the girls?

Barry Bonds Sentenced to 30 Days House Arrest, Probation For Obstruction of Justice
Celebrity News

Disgraced baseball great Barry Bonds was sentenced to 30 days house arrest and probation today – basically a slap on the wrist for the juiced up home run king.

A federal judge sentenced Bonds to probation and home confinement for obstructing justice during a grand jury probe into a firm that sold steroids to athletes.

U.S. District Judge Susan Illston stayed the sentence until a higher court rules on the appeal of Bonds’ conviction, which resulted from the years-long BALCO probe.

Barry Bonds: What a ...

The sentence caps the highest-profile trial in a 10-year PED case that ensnared athletes in several sports and revealed the use of previously undetectable steroids.

A number of athletes admitted using steroids during secret grand jury proceedings in 2003 related to the investigation of a Bay Area steroids manufacturer BALCO.

Federal prosecutors in 2007 charged Bonds with lying to the grand jury. A criminal jury in April convicted him of obstruction of justice for giving evasive answers.

Responding to questions about steroid use with non sequiturs and rambling digressions, Bonds basically dug his own grave there, not that he’ll be punished for it.

The jury failed to reach a verdict on three other charges, and prosecutors asked the judge to sentence Bonds to 15 months in prison. Clearly that didn’t work out.

After the hearing, Dennis Riordan, a lawyer for Bonds, said he believes the conviction will be thrown out on appeal, which it very well might, knowing this case.

His conviction in the court of public opinion? Another story entirely.